BIOGRAPHY OF THE AUTHOR

Achille De Tommaso graduated in Electronic Physics in Milan, with a thesis at the Higher School of Nuclear Engineering of the Politecnico; he is also a scholar of Anthropology and Behavioral Analysis. He has books and scientific publications to his credit.

Expert in documentary scientific research, he was vice-president and president of ANFOV, a study center for advanced telecommunications, for 30 years; in which the social implications of new technologies were also studied.

In the 90s, he was a consultant to the European Commission, DG XIII, and to the Soviet Academy of Sciences for the introduction of Electronic data Interchange services in Europe.

As CEO he has managed eight telecommunications companies after creating them.

In addition to his qualifications and studies, De Tommaso is also a lover of Music, History and Philosophy. 

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DIGITAL ANTHROPOLOGY

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We are more connected than ever online, but are these connections real human connections? Is technical progress human progress? How do technological devices affect our relationships? And, in the case of companies: is a hyper-connection enough to provide better efficiency and profit? People are getting used to considering the virtual world as a great centralizer of their attention, emotions and thoughts; and the temptation will be to give their loyalty to what not only weakens their relationship with nature, but,  with a possible corrosive effect, to their inner life. What is the difference between 'human' and 'digital', 'real' and 'virtual'? Social media can also unite. When you share a loss, or a failure, you can experience great solidarity.

 

When you feel insecure, you happen to turn to Facebook or Instagram for relief, and the results seem to be better than any other self-affirmation activity. Furthermore, the time spent on social media has to do with virtual new culture. Digital technology is therefore a new culture with people at the center; because Digital Humanism, for instance, is the result of a hitherto untested convergence between our complex cultural heritage and a technology that has produced an unprecedented social sphere.

 

This convergence, instead of simply forming a link between antiquity and today, has redistributed concepts, categories and objects, as well as associated behaviors and practices, all in a new environment.

In trying to understand how digital technologies affect individuals and companies, we must first understand the difference between the different categories,  but beware: the answers cannot be given only by technologists: the questions involve our whole being and living; such as information, art, culture, philosophy, religion, entertainment, economics, finance. And so on. It is important that anyone is aware of it. This book helps to understand these questions; and proposes some answers.

INDEX

 

PREFACE: TECHNOLOGY AND HUMAN CONNECTION p.11

 

INTRODUCTION: WHAT IS DIGITAL ANTHROPOLOGY? p.16

CHAPTER I

THE DIGITAL  WORLD AND THE HYPER-CONNECTIVITY OF COMPANIES P.21

 

1. The logistical problem of knowledge. Telcos as an important link in the connectivity chain. p.22

2. Industry 4.0 - it will be an anthropological revolution: let's see what it promises us p.33

3. "Industry 4.0": a look beyond the hedge. p.38

4. Careful not to let us destroy companies with industry 4.0 p.46

5. The internet of things (IOT) p.51

6. Digital anthropology and digital inclusion p.62

7. The robots used in companies are "electronic people" and steal our pensions p.68

8. Digital waste: this is what our posterity will find of us when they dig, looking for our remains; in thousands of years p.74

9. The digital slaves of the gig economy p.81

10. The digital exiles p.89

11. The digital world and the moral principles, declared but not observed p.97

CHAPTER II

THE DIGITAL HYPER-CONNECTIVITY OF INDIVIDUALS p.108

 

1. The reason for the success of “social media” p.109

2. But the digital person is more and more subject to a world that is “absent"  p.121

3. Social media: alone together p.134

4. With the internet they have stolen our time p.142

5. How to survive the haters. p.152

6. Are we immortal because we are digital? p.157

7. How digital technologies affect migration. p.162

CHAPTER III

THE CLASHES BETWEEN DIGITAL TECHNOLOGY AND: CULTURE, ART, PHILOSOPHY, AND RELIGION p.174

 

 

1. Rethinking the relationship between culture and technology p.175

2. Digital humanism p.183

3. Can a robot return your love? p.196

4. Digital anthropology: the future of music p.204

5. What is music? A miracle! p.216

6. Has the digital, technological, man perhaps lost contact with poetry? Maybe not: perhaps we can dream that science and poetry, together, can be the keys to the "Theory Of Everything" p.222

7. Human nature and anthropo-digital philosophy: we are only mind. Body, sex, ethnicity, are just “background noises” p.242

8. Death is a digital “order” p.255

9. The anthropic principle and immortality p.263

10. Digital anthropology and religion p.269

11. Is teleportation a technical or an ethical-religious problem? p.283

CHAPTER IV

RECENT NEW TECHNICAL - SCIENTIFIC

HORIZONS REVEALED BY  DIGITAL TECHNOLOGY p.290

 

1 black hole has become a fun curiosity for today's human being, who feeds more and more on technology. I provide a guide on how to photograph it p.291

2 gravitational waves. p.300

3 gravitational waves and the music of the spheres. p.309

4 the paradox of order which is against evolution p.316

5 can we change past and present with technology? p.322

6 the dark matter of the universe: one of the greatest mysteries of physics p.334

7 the battle between two theories of  the universe p.342

8 is quantum mechanics a crazy lie? p.353

9 everything will end, with a nice whimper p.264